8 Things you should know about Windows 7

Windows 7 has arrived at the time when the very concept of the desktop is being challenged by everything from virtual desktops and cloud options to netbooks and iPhones.

windows 7

We shall look at the eight elements of Windows 7, that need to considered by enterprises while opting for Microsoft’s latest operating system.

1. Remote Users will Love Win 7

Most of the times, employees work outside the office. For this reason, new strategies are required in order to keep them supported, secure, and productive. This is done by two key features of Windows 7, BranchCache and DirectAccess, which are excellent starting points for the next generation of improved mobile access.

In order to provide secure connectivity back to the main network, DirectAccess leverages IPv6 and IPsec into the system, regardless of where users are connected. BranchCache is also used to helps users outside the offices to keep working as the network can be configured to cache Web pages and files on local servers for sites without local servers, making frequently accessed data and files served up quickly to end users.

However, both the features require Windows Server 2008 R2.

2. Infosec Teams will Like Win 7

Some major improvements have been made regarding the security front in Windows 7. Windows 7 is one of the first products to come through the full development life cycle. Moreover, more thought has been put into reducing the impact that intrusive security can have on the user experience. The concept of User Account Control has been retained successfully while reducing the number of pop-ups that usually frustrate Vista users.

3. It has Better Management

Although the Windows Server 2008 R2 is not required by BitLocker and AppLocker, they do need Advance Group Policy Management 4.0. More than 350 new control options, many of which boost desktop control, power management, and the ability to use different functions based on machine location have been added too.

4. It’s Netbook-Friendly

The future most probably belongs to the netbooks, smaller and less expensive than laptops, netbooks are perfect mobile devices for those on a budget. Most of the netbooks in organizations today run XP Pro and Linux. Win 7 works well on most netbooks, especially the pro version.

5. Desktop Virtualization’s Coming

Windows 7 runs on all the main virtualization platforms, including VMware, Citrix, and Microsoft. However, display limitations and peripheral incompatibilities still remain.

The Windows 7 client also allows you to opt for its own virtualization option, XP Mode, which lets you run XP as a virtual machine in Windows 7.

6. Windows 7 is SaaS-Friendly

Due to the increasing number of business applications moving online, Windows 7 offers an environment friendly to software as a service. It has been tightly integrated with Internet Explorer 8, in order to provide a stable platform for Web applications. If you want to use Firefox or Chrome, you’ll have to watch their releases closely. Both have documented issues with Windows 7.

7. The Hype is Your Friend

Making users excited about a new OS helps in the long run to aid successful adoption. However, we have to remember that testing is extremely important, despite what users want. The initial release plan includes three full quarters of auditing and testing before the initial rollout.

8. You have a Definitive Timeline

Windows 7 is out and being deployed. It is for you to decide now whether you welcome Win 7, curse the demise of XP, adopt Windows 7, move to Linux, or bring back the abacus. Windows 7 has addressed all of the issues that were missing in Vista in order to satisfy customers.

3 thoughts on “8 Things you should know about Windows 7”

  1. “Windows 7 has addressed all of the issues that were missing in Vista in order to satisfy customers.”

    Then send it out as Vista SP3 and get on with life. MS decided to re-invent their OS with Vista. It came out with some major issues. They patched it up, but the REAL polish and optimization being done to it is now being packaged and sold as Win7. This is like a slap in the face to Vista users. It’s like “yeah, we know Vista wasn’t as great as we were hoping when it came out. But guess what, you can pay us another $150+ to get the better version of it now!”

    Gee, thanks. Why don’t you slap my wife and kick my dog while you’re at it. Personally, I vowed NEVER to pay for Windows again. I only use whatever comes with used comps I buy (I make sure the seller isn’t foisting a pirated copy onto me.) I bought a dual-core that came with Vista, and it was pretty bad initially, but after the SP’s, it was ok. I just bought a netbook that came with an XP license, but the tech guy loaded Win7 on it. Win7 is nice, but I’m not forking over a butt-load of money for what should have been a Service Pack for Vista.

    Microsoft is just milking folks with this one. They always pull this BS. They do a major change to their OS, quickly toss a version out that sucks (Win95, WinME), then follow up with a better version and charge you AGAIN for it (Win98, WinXP). Since even older computers can still do everything folks want to do (EG: a 2ghz w/1g ram can surf net, etc), and since WinXP is still capable of doing it all, Microsoft’s latest re-invention of the wheel for such a high price doesn’t really matter. Tons of folks will stick with WinXP, just as tons of folks have stuck with IE6. Folks really don’t care about new computers these days, since their old ones still do the job. Computers in general are not ramping up in “must have” technology as fast as they were during the 90′s. Microsoft is grasping for ways to keep re-inventing its software when it’s all pretty much as robust as folks care to have it.

    While Win 7 is a good product (based on using it), I just don’t predict tons of folks will scramble to uptake it. Sure, tech geeks and such, but average user who isn’t really tech savvy will stick with what they have. Most Win7 “sales” will come from folks buying new comps, and even then most folks don’t care about new comps since older comps still do the job.

  2. Well someone’s a little butthurt because they can’t afford Windows 7. W7 is everything Vista should have been. I have been using it since the beta (and now have Professional on my laptop) and have not even looked back to Vista to say goodbye. W7 is the real successor to XP. The reason Vista failed so badly is because of HARDWARE MANUFACTURERS NOT MAKING DRIVERS. This has nothing to do with Microsoft. Everyone needs to get off their damn high horse and give it a try. I guarantee you won’t look back either. Your ancient OS won’t hold out forever. The future is now.

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